Money’s importance from the religious perspective

Operational research and finance have natural connections. However, operational research represents a device to be used for catching financial phenomena, and such a device is usually mediated by social norms and corresponding relevant parameters. This paper contributes to this debate by focusing on a particular social norm—namely, religiosity- and its importance to the role of money. Such relationship is here treated under a quantitative perspective. In particular, we provide an econometric-statistic comparison between religion and money importance. The methodological toolkit is tested on high quality empirical data coming from a recent survey of Romanian population involving 842 persons, from the many faiths in the considered country. Specifically, statistical techniques include best fit curves analysis and data cross tabulations are checked using Chi squared test. The distinctions between different religious people beliefs relating to money are discussed. Insights regarding perceptions of different religious denominations are provided. Subsequent effects on entrepreneurship behavior are tested using Logit regression models. Results state that each religion-based segment of population has its own way to understand the importance of money, to promote and to evaluate the power of money, and finally to manage important inter-connections around the money.