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Conceptualising the ‘Perfect’ Family in Late Nineteenth-Century Philanthropic Institutions

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posted on 24.05.2019, 15:09 by Steven J. Taylor
Steve Taylor turns to the Waifs and Strays Society to rethink the nature, shape, and meaning of the working-class Victorian family. In a period when significant numbers of children were fostered for a variety of reasons by relatives, friends and other individuals it is hardly surprising that there was considerable discussion around the fragility of family units, ‘nomadic’ husbands, alcoholic parents, wandering wives, and working parents. At the core of these observations was an underlying concern that children were being failed by family and kin alike. Taylor examines how concerns about the young and their status in working families were represented in philanthropic institutions by middle-aged white men. His chapter picks up one of the main themes of this volume which is the idea that the shape and meaning of family were essentially imagined.

Funding

The research for this chapter would not have been possible without the help of Ian Wakeling and the archives team at the Children’s Society, and the fnancial support of the Wellcome Trust, WT108624MA.

History

Citation

Taylor, S, Conceptualising the ‘Perfect’ Family in Late Nineteenth-Century Philanthropic Institutions, 'Family Life in Britain, 1650–1910', Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2019, pp. 155-176

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of History, Politics and International Relations

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Taylor

Publisher

Palgrave Macmillan, Cham

isbn

978-3-030-04855-6

Copyright date

2019

Available date

24/05/2019

Publisher version

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-04855-6_8

Editors

Beardmore, Carol;Dobbing, Cara;King, Steven

Language

en