SIOP+2018+abs1.pdf (142.73 kB)
Download file

The Impact of Central-Line Infections on Children and Families

Download (142.73 kB)
conference contribution
posted on 19.05.2020, 12:16 by C Soto, C Tarrant, M Dixon-Woods

Background/Objectives

Central-venous access devices (CVADs) are used in children with complex medical conditions to deliver life-saving treatments, such as chemotherapy and nutritional support. Infections of CVADs (central-line associated bloodstream infections; CLABSI), although rare, can result in prolonged hospital admissions, intensive care admissions and even death. As more children are facilitated to live at home, the impact of CLABSI on the emotional and mental health of the children at home and their families requires exploration.

Design/Methods

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of eleven children, and with twenty professionals. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method. Data were collected as part of a larger study exploring care of invasive devices in the community.

Results

Four families had personal experience of CLABSI, and all families were aware of other children who had experienced or even died of CLABSI. CLABSIs were unpredictable and children could deteriorate rapidly. Parents who had experiences CLABSI recounted the frightening and traumatic event and described vivid memories of their child’s illness. All parents, irrespective of first-hand familiarity or not, experienced unrelenting fear that their child would develop an infection and die. Families described a state of constant vigilance where they continually monitored the child for signs of infection to ensure that they could receive treatment, further adding to their emotional workload. Hospital admissions further disrupted family life, affecting parents’ work, school, hobbies and family celebrations.

Conclusions

CLABSIs are associated with significant disruption to children and families. The threat of CLABSI results in significant emotional distress for families in addition to their existing burdens. Professionals should be aware of this emotional burden when counselling families about the risk of CLABSI. Children and families with experience of CLABSI may benefit from additional psychological support.

History

Citation

SIOP ABSTRACTS, PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER, 2018, 65, pp. S544-S545 (2)

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Source

The 50th Congress of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) Kyoto, Japan November 16–19, 2018

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER

Volume

65

Issue

S2

Pagination

e27455 S544-S545 (2)

Publisher

WILEY

issn

1545-5009

eissn

1545-5017

Copyright date

2018

Available date

21/09/2018

Publisher version

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pbc.27455

Notes

Abstract only

Spatial coverage

Kyoto, Japan

Temporal coverage: start date

16/11/2018

Temporal coverage: end date

19/11/2018

Language

en