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And ... action? Gender, knowledge and inequalities in the UK screen industries

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journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2018, 16:51 by Doris Ruth Eikhof, Jack Newsinger, Daria Luchinskaya, Daniela Aidley
This article explores how a knowledge ecology framework can help us better understand the production of gender knowledge, especially in relation to improving gender equality. Drawing on Law et al. (2011), it analyses what knowledge of gender inequality is made visible and actionable in the case of the UK screen sector. We, firstly, show (1) that the gender knowledge production for the UK screen sector operated with reductionist understandings of gender and gender inequality, and presented gender inequality as something that needed evidencing rather than changing, and (2) that gender knowledge was circulated in two relatively distinct circuits, a policy- and practice-facing one focused on workforce statistics and a more heterogeneous and critical academic one. We then discuss which aspects of gender inequality in the UK screen industry remained invisible and thus less actionable. The article concludes with a critical appreciation of how the knowledge ecology framework might help better understand gender knowledge production, in relation to social change in the UK screen sector and beyond.

History

Citation

Gender, Work and Organization, 2018

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Business

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Gender

Publisher

Wiley

issn

0968-6673

eissn

1468-0432

Acceptance date

17/09/2018

Copyright date

2019

Publisher version

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gwao.12318

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 24 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en

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