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Are structured interviews truly able to detect and diagnose Bipolar II disorders in epidemiological studies? The king is still nude!

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journal contribution
posted on 22.04.2016, 11:15 by M. G. Carta, M. C. Hardoy, Tom Fryers
Introduction A research commentary published in 2005 pointed out that the apparently low prevalence of Bipolar Disorder diagnosis as reported by epidemiological studies may be related to the under-estimate of bipolar disorder cases generally yielded by methodological instruments that are applied in such investigations. New data apparently challenge this notion More recent publications have presented new results that apparently contradict the issues raised by the commentary, stating that the CIDI interview, which is used in the most important epidemiological studies is not only valid but highly reliable in identifying bipolar disorders. Commentary This paper analyzes the new data and concludes that they do not give a clear indication as to how reliably the CIDI can recognize undiagnosed bipolar disorder cases. Further research studies are needed on larger "negative" (to the CIDI) samples before the field will be persuaded that CIDI really does what it is supposed to do.

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Citation

Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health 2008 4:28

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health 2008 4:28

Publisher

Bentham Open

issn

1745-0179

eissn

1745-0179

Acceptance date

21/11/2008

Copyright date

2008

Available date

22/04/2016

Publisher version

http://cpementalhealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1745-0179-4-28

Language

en

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