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Comparison of Logarithmic Reading Charts for Visual Assessment in Normally Sighted Participants

journal contribution
posted on 06.05.2022, 10:55 by Yahya A Maeni, Kevin B Paterson, John Maltby, Victoria A McGowan, Claire Hutchinson

SIGNIFICANCE 

Logarithmic reading charts provide standardized measures of reading performance. Here we show that existing charts provide equivalent assessments of visual aspects of reading that are in good agreement with traditional measures of visual acuity and seem uninfluenced by cognitive (linguistic) factors.


PURPOSE 

The aims of this study were to (1) determine the equivalence of logarithmic charts of sentence and word reading, (2) evaluate the relationship between reading chart performance and more traditional measures of visual assessment, and (3) establish the influence of linguistic factors on reading chart performance.


METHODS 

In a sample of 82 normally sighted participants, we determined performance on the reading measures (e.g., reading acuity, reading speed, critical print size) of the following logarithmic charts of sentence and word reading: The Colenbrander English Continuous Text Near Vision Card, Radner Reading Chart, Minnesota Reading Acuity Chart, and Smith-Kettlewell Reading Chart. In doing so, we compared performance on reading measures between charts and with performance on more traditional measures of visual assessment (uncrowded and crowded letter acuity, stereoacuity, accommodation) and cognitive measures of word knowledge and ability (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Vocabulary Subtest, National Adult Reading Test).


RESULTS 

Factor analysis confirmed that performance on the reading measures (reading acuity, reading speed, critical print size) was equivalent across charts. Reading test performance was also related to more traditional measures of vision, the most consistent of which were significant associations between reading acuity and acuity for single-letter optotypes. There were no significant associations between reading chart performance and cognitive measures of word knowledge and ability.


CONCLUSIONS 

The findings presented here suggest that logarithmic charts composed of sentences and words represent an alternative to traditional letter acuity testing. This is particularly the case for measures of reading acuity.

History

Citation

Optometry and Vision Science: March 2022 - Volume 99 - Issue 3 - p 292-297. doi: 10.1097/OPX.0000000000001865

Author affiliation

Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour, College of Life Sciences

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Optometry and Vision Science

Volume

99

Issue

3

Pagination

292 - 297

Publisher

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins

issn

1040-5488

eissn

1538-9235

Acceptance date

12/12/2021

Copyright date

2022

Available date

01/03/2023

Spatial coverage

United States

Language

English