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Demographic and occupational determinants of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seropositivity in hospital staff.

journal contribution
posted on 27.11.2020, 17:42 by Christopher A Martin, Prashanth Patel, Charles Goss, David R Jenkins, Arthur Price, Linda Barton, Pankaj Gupta, Francesco Zaccardi, Helen Jerina, Sai Duraisingham, Nigel J Brunskill, Kamlesh Khunti, Manish Pareek
BACKGROUND: Although evidence suggests that demographic characteristics including minority ethnicity increase the risk of infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), it is unclear whether these characteristics, together with occupational factors, influence anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroprevalence in hospital staff. METHODS: We conducted cross-sectional surveillance examining seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG amongst staff at University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) NHS Trust. We quantified seroprevalence stratified by ethnicity, occupation and seniority of practitioner and used logistic regression to examine demographic and occupational factors associated with seropositivity. RESULTS: A total of 1148/10662 (10.8%) hospital staff members were seropositive. Compared to White staff (seroprevalence 9.1%), seroprevalence was higher in South Asian (12.3%) and Black (21.2%) staff. The occupations and department with the highest seroprevalence were nurses/healthcare assistants (13.7%) and the Emergency Department (ED)/Acute Medicine (17.5%), respectively. Seroprevalence decreased with seniority in medical/nursing practitioners. Minority ethnicity was associated with seropositivity on an adjusted analysis (South Asian: aOR 1.26; 95%CI: 1.07-1.49 and Black: 2.42; 1.90-3.09). Anaesthetics/ICU staff members were less likely to be seropositive than ED/Acute medicine staff (0.41; 0.27-0.61). CONCLUSIONS: Ethnicity and occupational factors, including specialty and seniority, are associated with seropositivity for anti-SARS-Cov-2 IgG. These findings could be used to inform occupational risk assessments for front-line healthcare workers.

Funding

This work was supported by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR). MP is supported by an NIHR Development and Skills Enhancement award (NIHR301192) and is in receipt of funding from United Kingdom Research and Innovation/Medical Research Council (UKRI/MRC) (MR/V027549/1).

History

Citation

Journal of Public Health, fdaa199, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdaa199

Author affiliation

Diabetes Research Centre, College of Life Sciences

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

J Public Health (Oxf)

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP)

eissn

1741-3850

Acceptance date

13/10/2020

Copyright date

2020

Available date

16/11/2021

Spatial coverage

England

Language

eng

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