Rayne et al 2017 Endangered Archaeology in Libya.pdf (89.44 MB)
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Endangered archaeology in Libya: recording damage and destruction

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journal contribution
posted on 08.02.2018, 11:26 by Louise E. Rayne, Nichole Sheldrick, Julia Nikolaus
Libya’s archaeological heritage is under serious threat, not only because of recent conflict, but also due to other factors such as urban expansion, agricultural development, natural resource prospection, vandalism, looting and natural deterioration. The Endangered Archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa Project (EAMENA) has developed a database and methodology using remote sensing and other techniques to rapidly document archaeological sites and any disturbances and threats to them in Libya and across the MENA region. This paper will demonstrate this methodology and highlight the various types of disturbances and threats affecting the archaeology of Libya, concentrating on four case studies in different areas of the country, including the coastal plain around Zliten, a section of the Wadi Sofeggin in the pre-desert, and the desert oases of Jufra and Murzuq.

History

Citation

Libyan Studies, 2017, 48, pp. 23–49

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Archaeology and Ancient History

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Libyan Studies

Publisher

Cambridge University Press (CUP)

issn

0263-7189

eissn

2052-6148

Acceptance date

14/07/2017

Copyright date

2017

Available date

08/02/2018

Publisher version

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/libyan-studies/article/endangered-archaeology-in-libya-recording-damage-and-destruction/59C240F04F16EE257ED76D27E02A482C

Language

en

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