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Explaining the relationship between number line estimation and mathematical achievement: The role of visuo-motor integration and visuo-spatial skills

journal contribution
posted on 05.01.2016, 09:49 by Victoria Simms, Sarah E. Clayton, Lucy Cragg, Camilla Gilmore, Samantha J. Johnson
Performance on number line tasks, typically used as a measure of numerical representations, are reliably related to children’s mathematical achievement. However, recent debate has questioned what precisely performance on the number line estimation task measures. Specifically, there has been a suggestion that this task may measure not only numerical representations but also proportional judgment skills; if this is the case, then individual differences in visuospatial skills, not just the precision of numerical representations, may explain the relationship between number line estimation and mathematical achievement. The current study investigated the relationships among visuospatial skills, visuomotor integration, number line estimation, and mathematical achievement. In total, 77 children were assessed using a number line estimation task, a standardized measure of mathematical achievement, and tests of visuospatial skills and visuomotor integration. The majority of measures were significantly correlated. In addition, the relationship between one metric from the number line estimation task (R^2LIN) and mathematical achievement was fully explained by visuomotor integration and visuospatial skill competency. These results have important implications for understanding what the number line task measures as well as the choice of number line metric for research purposes.

Funding

This study was funded by a project Grant (SP4575) from Action Medical Research (AMR), United Kingdom. C.G. is supported by a U.K. Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowship.

History

Citation

Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 145 (2016) 22–33

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Journal of Experimental Child Psychology 145 (2016) 22–33

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

1096-0457

eissn

0022-0965

Acceptance date

14/12/2015

Copyright date

2016

Available date

07/07/2017

Publisher version

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022096515003057

Notes

The file associated with this record is embargoed until 18 months after the date of publication. The final published version may be available through the links above.

Language

en

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