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Fractionated radiation exposure amplifies the radioresistant nature of prostate cancer cells.

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posted on 11.11.2016, 16:08 by N. McDermott, A. Meunier, B. Mooney, G. Nortey, C. Hernandez, S. Hurley, N. Lynam-Lennon, S. H. Barsoom, K. J. Bowman, B. Marples, G. D. Jones, L. Marignol
The risk of recurrence following radiation therapy remains high for a significant number of prostate cancer patients. The development of in vitro isogenic models of radioresistance through exposure to fractionated radiation is an increasingly used approach to investigate the mechanisms of radioresistance in cancer cells and help guide improvements in radiotherapy standards. We treated 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells with fractionated 2 Gy radiation to a cumulative total dose of 60 Gy. This process selected for 22Rv1-cells with increased clonogenic survival following subsequent radiation exposure but increased sensitivity to Docetaxel. This RR-22Rv1 cell line was enriched in S-phase cells, less susceptible to DNA damage, radiation-induced apoptosis and acquired enhanced migration potential, when compared to wild type and aged matched control 22Rv1 cells. The selection of radioresistant cancer cells during fractionated radiation therapy may have implications in the development and administration of future targeted therapy in conjunction with radiation therapy.

Funding

We would like to acknowledge support from the Irish Cancer Society (grant code PCA12MAR). Gabrielle Nortey sand Christopher Hernandez were Mount Sinai International Exchange Program minority student participants. Their work was supported in part by grant MD001452 from the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health. Their work was supported in part by grant MD 001452 from the National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Luz Claudio, Principal Investigator. Sarah Hurley was supported by a grant from the M.Sc. in Molecular Medicine, Department of Clinical Medicine at Trinity College Dublin. We would also like to acknowledge the help and support of Dr. Eamon Breen in the Institute of Molecular Medicine Flow Cytometry Facility.

History

Citation

Scientific Reports, 2016, 6:34796

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Scientific Reports

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

issn

2045-2322

eissn

2045-2322

Acceptance date

19/09/2016

Available date

11/11/2016

Publisher version

http://www.nature.com/articles/srep34796

Language

en

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