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Gamma-ray bursts, supernova kicks, and gravitational radiation

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journal contribution
posted on 23.10.2019, 16:04 by Melvyn B. Davies, Andrew King, Stephan Rosswog, Graham Wynn
We suggest that the collapsing core of a massive rotating star may fragment to produce two or more compact objects. Their coalescence under gravitational radiation gives the resulting black hole or neutron star a significant kick velocity, which may explain those observed in pulsars. A gamma-ray burst can result only when this kick is small. Thus, only a small fraction of core-collapse supernovae produce gamma-ray bursts. The burst may be delayed significantly (hours to days) after the supernova, as suggested by recent observations. If our picture is correct, core-collapse supernovae should be significant sources of gravitational radiation with a chirp signal similar to a coalescing neutron star binary.

Funding

MBD gratefully acknowledges the support of a URF from the Royal Society. Theoretical astrophysics at Leicester is supported by a PPARC rolling grant.

History

Citation

Astrophysical Journal, 2002, 579 (2), pp. L63-L66 (4)

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/Department of Physics and Astronomy

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Astrophysical Journal

Publisher

American Astronomical Society, IOP Publishing

issn

0004-637X

Copyright date

2002

Available date

23/10/2019

Publisher version

https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/345288

Language

en