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Guyana’s Prisons: Colonial Histories of Post-Colonial Challenges

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journal contribution
posted on 20.11.2020, 11:13 by Clare Anderson, Mellissa Ifill, Estherine Adams, Kellie Moss
This article argues that history can play a role in addressing present-day concerns about the form and function of incarceration in the post-colonial nation of Guyana. It analyses some of the key features of imprisonment during the British colonial period (1814–1966), and connects them to the challenges faced by the prisons sector since Independence in 1966. The authors suggest that an appreciation of the history of jails in Guyana – including issues connected with prison capacity, overcrowding, training and education, and rehabilitation – can play a role in inspiring and supporting change in the Guyana Prison Service. In this way, the article suggests, historical research can impact on the administration of criminal justice in Guyana – and potentially in other contemporary post-colonial contexts, both within, and beyond, the Caribbean region.

Funding

British Academy. Grant Number: IC2\100030

Economic and Social Research Council. Grant Number: ES/S000569/1

Research England

History

Citation

Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, Volume 59, Issue 3, Special Issue: ‘Can History Make a Difference? The Relationship Between the History of Crime and Criminal Justice Policy’, September 2020, Pages 335-349

Author affiliation

School of History, Politics and International Relations

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Howard Journal of Crime and Justice

Volume

59

Issue

3

Pagination

335 - 349

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

issn

2059-1098

eissn

2059-1101

Acceptance date

08/03/2020

Copyright date

2020

Available date

08/09/2020

Language

en