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Healed impact trauma to a Neolithic cattle frontal bone: a posthuman perspective

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journal contribution
posted on 28.02.2019, 12:31 by E Banfield, A Stoll, R Thomas
Trauma associated with slaughter is identified occasionally archaeologically in the cranial remains of domesticated animals, with evidence for pole-axing occurring in Europe, especially from the Roman period onwards. The injury typically extends through the frontal bone and sinuses to penetrate the braincase, causing haemorrhage, loss of consciousness, brain damage, and death. Evidence for slaughter methods in the British Neolithic, however, is lacking. We report such evidence from a healed blunt-force impact trauma to the frontal bone of a domestic cattle skull from Beckhampton Road Neolithic long barrow, Wiltshire. The injury suggests a failed attempt at slaughter. To our knowledge, this is the first such report for domestic cattle from the British Neolithic. We contextualise this discovery, drawing on research into the role and meaning of faunal remains from Neolithic long barrows in Wiltshire. This work has been undertaken from a posthuman perspective. Thus, we demonstrate the opportunities for paleopathologists to inform and engage within posthumanist interpretative frameworks.

Funding

This work was supported by Midlands3Cities and AHRC (grant number 1502815)

History

Citation

International Journal of Paleopathology, 2018, 24, pp. 197-200 (4)

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCES, ARTS AND HUMANITIES/School of Archaeology and Ancient History/Core Staff

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

International Journal of Paleopathology

Publisher

Elsevier for Paleopathology Association

issn

1879-9817

Acceptance date

12/11/2018

Copyright date

2018

Available date

28/02/2019

Publisher version

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1879981718301566?via=ihub

Language

en

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