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Holding the future together: towards a theorisation of the spaces and times of transition

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journal contribution
posted on 24.10.2012, 08:55 by Gavin Brown, Peter Kraftl, Jenny Pickerill, Caroline Upton
Social scientists often use the notion of ‘transition’ to denote diverse trajectories of change in different types of bodies: from individuals, to communities, to nation-states. Yet little work has theorised how transition might occur across, between, or beyond these bodies. The aim of this paper is to sketch out a multiple, synthetic, and generative (but by no means universal) theory of transition. Primarily drawing on the British context, we explore and exemplify two contentions. Firstly, that the notion of transition is increasingly being deployed to frame and combine discourses in terms of community development, responses to environmental change, and the individual lifecourse. Specifically framed as ‘transition’, such discourses are gaining increasing purchase in imagining futures that reconfigure, but do not transform, assumed neoliberal futures. Our second contention is that these discourses and policies must try to ‘hold the future together’ in one or more senses. They must wrestle with a tension between imminent threats (climate change, economic nonproductivity) which weigh heavily on the present and its possible futures, and the precarious act of redirecting those futures in ways that might better hold together diverse social groups, communities, and places.

History

Citation

Environment and Planning A, 2012, 44 (7), pp. 1607-1623

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Environment and Planning A

Publisher

Pion

issn

0308-518X

eissn

1472-3409

Copyright date

2012

Available date

24/10/2012

Publisher version

http://www.envplan.com/abstract.cgi?id=a44608

Notes

Gavin Brown, Peter Kraftl et al., 2012. The definitive, peer-reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Environment and Planning A, 44 (7), pp. 1607-1623, 2012, DOI 10.1068/a44608.

Language

en