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Influence of childhood socioeconomic position and ability on mid-life cognitive function: Evidence from three British birth cohorts

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journal contribution
posted on 18.06.2021, 11:00 by E McElroy, M Richards, E Fitzsimons, G Conti, GB Ploubidis, A Sullivan, V Moulton
Background: Childhood socioeconomic position (SEP) is robustly associated with cognitive function later in life. However, it is unclear whether this reflects a direct relationship, or an indirect association via modifiable factors such as educational attainment and occupation. We sought to clarify these associations using retrospectively harmonised data from three ongoing British birth cohorts. Methods: We analysed data from the 1946 National Survey of Health and Development (n=2283), the 1958 National Child Development Study (n=9385) and the 1970 British Cohort Study (n=7631). Retrospective harmonisation was used to derive equivalent indicators of cognition, SEP, education and occupation across the three cohorts. Structural equation modelling was used to examine the association between childhood SEP and mid-life cognitive function, via childhood cognitive ability, educational attainment and mid-life occupation. Results: Across all three cohorts, no direct pathways were observed between childhood SEP and mid-life cognitive function. Rather, this association was indirect via the three temporally ordered mediators. In addition, the direct pathway between childhood cognition and adult cognitive function was weaker in the two younger studies. Conclusions: Across three British birth cohorts, we found that the association between early life SEP and mid-life cognitive function was fully mediated by childhood cognitive ability, educational attainment and occupational status. Furthermore, the association between early cognitive ability and mid-life cognitive function has decreased in younger generations. Therefore, cognitive function in adulthood may be influenced by modifiable factors and societal change.

Funding

This project is part of a collaborative research programme entitled ‘Cohorts and Longitudinal Studies Enhancement Resources’ (CLOSER) funded by the ESRC (http://www.esrc.ac.uk) (ES/K000357/1).

History

Citation

McElroy E, et al. J Epidemiol Community Health 2021;75:643–650

Author affiliation

Department of Neuroscience, Psychology and Behaviour

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

Volume

75

Pagination

643-650

Publisher

BMJ Publishing Group

issn

0143-005X

eissn

1470-2738

Acceptance date

06/12/2020

Copyright date

2021

Available date

18/06/2021

Spatial coverage

England

Language

eng

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