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Lake Ontario salmon (Salmo salar) were not migratory: A long-standing historical debate solved through stable isotope analysis

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posted on 12.08.2020, 11:09 by EJ Guiry, S Needs-Howarth, KD Friedland, AL Hawkins, P Szpak, R Macdonald, M Courtemanche, E Holm, MP Richards
Lake Ontario once supported a large complex of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) populations that became extinct prior to scientific study. Since the 1860s, research efforts to conserve and reintroduce a sustainable population of Atlantic Salmon have focused on determining whether Lake Ontario's original salmon populations had migrated to the Atlantic Ocean as part of their lifecycle (anadromy), stayed in the lake year-round (potamodromy), or both. We used stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope analyses of archaeological bones and historical museum-archived salmon scales to show that the original salmon populations from Lake Ontario completed their entire lifecycle without migrating to the Atlantic Ocean. With a time depth of more than 500 years, our findings provide a unique baseline with significant potential for informing modern restocking and conservation efforts.

History

Citation

Guiry, E., Needs-Howarth, S., Friedland, K. et al. Lake Ontario salmon (Salmo salar) were not migratory: A long-standing historical debate solved through stable isotope analysis. Sci Rep 6, 36249 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep36249

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Scientific Reports

Volume

6

Issue

1

Pagination

36249

Publisher

Nature Research

issn

2045-2322

eissn

2045-2322

Acceptance date

12/10/2016

Copyright date

2016

Available date

12/08/2020

Spatial coverage

England

Language

eng

Publisher version

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep36249

Licence

Exports