Metabolomics of Pregnancy Complications: Emerging Application of Maternal Hair.pdf (888.39 kB)
Download file

Metabolomics of Pregnancy Complications: Emerging Application of Maternal Hair.

Download (888.39 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 23.09.2019, 14:19 by TDJ Delplancke, Y Wu, T-L Han, LR Joncer, H Qi, C Tong, PN Baker
In recent years, the study of metabolomics has begun to receive increasing international attention, especially as it pertains to medical research. This is due in part to the potential for discovery of new biomarkers in the metabolome and to a new understanding of the "exposome", which refers to the endogenous and exogenous compounds that reflect external exposures. Consequently, metabolomics research into pregnancy-related issues has increased. Biomarkers discovered through metabolomics may shed some light on the etiology of certain pregnancy-related complications and their adverse effects on future maternal health and infant development and improve current clinical management. The discoveries and methods used in these studies will be compiled and summarized within the following paper. A further focus of this paper is the use of hair as a biological sample, which is gaining increasing attention across diverse fields due to its noninvasive sampling method and the metabolome stability. Its significance in exposome studies will be considered in this review, as well as the potential to associate exposures with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Currently, hair has been used in only two metabolomics studies relating to fetal growth restriction (FGR) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM).

Funding

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of Reproductive Health & Major Birth Defects Control and Prevention (2016YFC1000407), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81520108013, 81671488, and 81871189), Chongqing Municipal Education Commission (CXTDX201601014), Science and Technology Commission of Chongqing (cstc2017jcyjBX0045), and Chongqing Entrepreneurship and Innovation Supporting Program for Returned Overseas Students (cx2017104).

History

Citation

BioMed Research International, 2018, Volume 2018, Article ID 2815439, 19 pages

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

BioMed Research International

Publisher

Hindawi

eissn

2314-6141

Acceptance date

18/11/2018

Copyright date

2018

Available date

23/09/2019

Publisher version

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2018/2815439/

Language

en

Usage metrics

Categories

Keywords

Licence

Exports