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Muscle power and physical dysfunction: A model for tailoring rehabilitation in chronic kidney disease

journal contribution
posted on 20.09.2021, 13:58 by Thomas J Wilkinson, Eleanor F Gore, Luke A Baker, Emma L Watson, Alice C Smith
Introduction
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by adverse physical function. Mechanical muscle power describes the product of muscular force and velocity of contraction. In CKD, the role of mechanical muscle power is poorly understood and often overlooked as a target in rehabilitation. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of mechanical power with the ability to complete activities of daily living and physical performance.

Method
Mechanical muscle power was estimated using the sit-to-stand-5 test. Legs lean mass was derived using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Physical performance was assessed using gait speed and ‘timed-up-and-go’ (TUAG) tests. Self-reported activities of daily living (ADLs) were assessed via the Duke Activity Status Index. Balance and postural stability (postural sway and velocity) was assessed using a FysioMeter. Sex-specific tertiles were used to determine low levels of power.

Results
One hundred and two non-dialysis CKD participants were included (age: 62.0 (±14.1) years, n = 49 males (48%), eGFR: 38.0 (±21.5) ml/min/1.73m2). The mean relative power was 3.1 (±1.5) W/kg in females and 3.3 (±1.3) W/kg in males. Low relative power was found in 34% of patients. Relative power was an independent predictor of ADLs (β = .413, p = .004), and TUAG (β = −.719, p < .001) and gait speed (β = .404, p = .003) performance. Skeletal muscle mass was not associated with any outcomes.

Conclusion
Knowledge of the factors that mediate physical function impairment is crucial for developing effective interventions. Incorporation of power-based training focusing primarily on movement velocity may present the best strategy for improving physical function in CKD, above those that focus on increasing muscle mass.

History

Citation

Nephrology, Volume 26, Issue 10, October 2021, Pages 790-797

Author affiliation

Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Nephrology

Volume

26

Issue

10

Pagination

790 - 797

Publisher

Wiley for Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology

issn

1320-5358

eissn

1440-1797

Acceptance date

03/05/2021

Copyright date

2021

Available date

03/07/2022

Spatial coverage

Australia

Language

English