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Psychometric properties of the Mindsets of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (MDASS) in Chinese young adults and adolescents

journal contribution
posted on 22.09.2021, 13:07 by Shimin Zhu, Yanqiong Zhuang, Paul Lee
Aim
Mindset has been found to be closely related to mental health symptoms. Yet no scale for the Mindsets of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress (MDASS) has been validated. This study developed a 12-item MDASS with four items in each domain and examined its psychometric properties among young adults and adolescents.

Methods
Young adults (Study 1: N = 1735, aged 18–25) and adolescents (Study 2, N = 1648, aged 9–16) completed socio-demographics information, MDASS (unidirectional items in Study 1 and bi-directional items in Study 2), and mental health symptoms measures. Both samples were randomly divided into two equal sub-samples, one for exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to identify the factor structure, the other for confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to assess the goodness-of-fit of EFA models. Spearman correlations were used to assess the convergent validity of MDASS with measures of depression, anxiety, and stress.

Results
In Study 1, EFA yielded a three-factor model with underlying factors of fixed mindsets on depression, anxiety, and stress; CFA revealed a good goodness-of-fit (CFI and TFI >0.95; RMSEA and SRMR <0.08). In Study 2 with reversed items, EFA and CFA yielded a complex model structure. Fixed mindsets were positively correlated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (all absolute correlations >0.3) in both studies.

Conclusion
MDASS is a reliable scale with clear factor structure to measure mindsets of negative emotions among early adults. MDASS is suggested to use only fixed-mindset statements. The MDASS are highly associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress.

Funding

This work was supported by an Early Career Scheme Fund awarded to SZ from the Hong Kong Research Grant Council (Ref:25605418)

History

Citation

Early Intervention in Psychiatry, 2021, https://doi.org/10.1111/eip.13177

Author affiliation

Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Early Intervention in Psychiatry

Publisher

WILEY

issn

1751-7885

eissn

1751-7893

Acceptance date

05/05/2021

Copyright date

2021

Available date

30/05/2022

Spatial coverage

Australia

Language

English