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Soundtracks of acrobatic selves: Fan-Site religion in the reception and use of the music of U2

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journal contribution
posted on 06.03.2012, 14:00 by Clive. Marsh, Vaughan S. Roberts
This article addresses the question of how responses to the arts and popular culture, as mediated through on-line fan activity, may contribute to the development of religious/spiritual exploration in contemporary Western societies. It offers a critical reading of 40 short essays posted by fans of the rock band U2 on a fan site from the perspective of how respondents expose their personal, critical reflections on their developing selves. The function of the U2 songs reflected upon, the listeners’ responses, the strategies/processes used, and the resources upon which they draw in the task of reflection are noted and examined. The article maps a multi-disciplinary programme for examining responses, uses one sociological framework (as provided by the work of Margaret Archer) as a case study of how this multi-disciplinary framework may prove fruitful, and concludes by noting the benefits for contemporary religious/theological understanding of the on-line activity studied.

History

Citation

Journal of Contemporary Religion, 2011, 26 (3), pp. 419-432.

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SOCIAL SCIENCE/Institute of Lifelong Learning

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Journal of Contemporary Religion

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

issn

1353-7903

eissn

1469-9419

Copyright date

2011

Available date

11/04/2013

Publisher version

http://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1353-7903&date=2011&volume=26&issue=3&spage=419

Language

en

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Categories

Keywords

Exports