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The Case for a High-Redshift Origin of GRB100205A

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journal contribution
posted on 23.04.2020, 15:14 by AA Chrimes, AJ Levan, ER Stanway, E Berger, JS Bloom, SB Cenko, BE Cobb, A Cucchiara, AS Fruchter, BP Gompertz, J Hjorth, P Jakobsson, JD Lyman, P O'Brien, DA Perley, NR Tanvir, PJ Wheatley, K Wiersema
The number of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) known to have occurred in the distant Universe (z greater than 5) is small (approx 15), however these events provide a powerful way of probing star formation at the onset of galaxy evolution. In this paper, we present the case for GRB100205A being a largely overlooked high-redshift event. While initially noted as a high-z candidate, this event and its host galaxy have not been explored in detail. By combining optical and near-infrared Gemini afterglow imaging (at t less than 1.3 days since burst) with deep late-time limits on host emission from the Hubble Space Telescope, we show that the most likely scenario is that GRB100205A arose in the redshift range 4-8. GRB100205A is an example of a burst whose afterglow, even at 1 hour post-burst, could only be identified by 8m class IR observations, and suggests that such observations of all optically dark bursts may be necessary to significantly enhance the number of high-redshift GRBs known.

History

Citation

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 488, Issue 1, September 2019, Pages 902–909, https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz1811

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/Department of Physics and Astronomy

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society

Volume

488

Issue

1

Pagination

902–909

Publisher

Oxford University Press (OUP), Royal Astronomical Society

eissn

1365-2966

Acceptance date

27/06/2019

Copyright date

2019

Available date

02/07/2019

Publisher version

https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/488/1/902/5527327

Language

en