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The Legacy of Coalition: Fear and Loathing in Conservative Politics, 1922-1931

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journal contribution
posted on 20.04.2012, 15:11 by Stuart Ryan Ball
The split over the coalition in October 1922 caused long-term disunity in the Conservative Party, and the distinction between pro- and anti-coalitionists remained the most significant fault-line in Conservative politics for the next nine years. The new leadership and the majority of backbench MPs constantly suspected the former coalitionists of plotting to reverse the verdict of 1922. The legacy of bitterness and distrust was a crucial factor in the key events of the period, including the aftermath of the 1923 election defeat, the formation of the 1924 cabinet, the ‘cruiser crisis’ of 1925, the Irwin Declaration crisis of 1929, and the attacks on Baldwin’s leadership in 1930-31.

History

Citation

Contemporary British History, 2011, 25 (1), pp. 65-82

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF ARTS, HUMANITIES AND LAW/School of Historical Studies

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Contemporary British History

Publisher

Routledge (Taylor & Francis)

issn

1361-9462

eissn

1743-7997

Copyright date

2011

Available date

24/07/2012

Publisher version

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13619462.2011.546103

Notes

This is an electronic version of an article published in Stuart Ball (2011): The Legacy of Coalition: Fear and Loathing in Conservative Politics, 1922–1931, Contemporary British History, 25:01, 65-82. Contemporary British History is available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1361-9462&date=2011&volume=25&issue=1&spage=65

Language

en