McCoy+et+al.+revised_final_final.pdf (2.52 MB)
Download file

The chemistry of American and African amber, copal, and resin from the genus Hymenaea

Download (2.52 MB)
journal contribution
posted on 16.04.2018, 08:46 by Victoria E. McCoy, Arnoud Boom, Mónica M. Solórzano Kraemer, Sarah E. Gabbott
The comparison of the chemical composition of fossilized amber, copal, and resin is important for determining the botanic origin and original chemical composition of fossilized amber and copal, and for understanding the ecologic role of resin. Here we use solid phase microextraction–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (SPME–GC–MS) to investigate the volatile and semi-volatile composition of amber, copal and resin from Africa and the Americas, produced by trees from the genus Hymenaea. We found there are four subgroups of Hymenaea resin, copal, and amber, based upon age and chemical similarity: African amber, American amber, African resin/copal (which also includes Colombian copal), and American resin/copal. This analysis allows us to narrow down the potential botanic origin of amber and copal samples, and also indicates that within this genus, resin similarity does not correspond closely with phylogenetic relationships. Therefore, resin chemistry may have been controlled by ecologic pressures, such as defence against herbivores, wood borers, humidity, and diseases and the original chemical composition of amber and copal could potentially be used to understand the role of resin in plant–insect interactions through time.

History

Citation

Organic Geochemistry, 2017, 113, pp. 43-54

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/School of Geography, Geology and the Environment/Physical Geography

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Organic Geochemistry

Publisher

Elsevier

issn

0146-6380

Acceptance date

10/08/2017

Copyright date

2017

Available date

31/08/2019

Publisher version

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0146638017301857?via=ihub

Notes

The file associated with this record is under embargo until 24 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Language

en