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The new yeast is a mouse!

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journal contribution
posted on 26.03.2014, 14:04 by Rhona H. Borts
In many organisms including yeast, mice, and humans, an essential feature of meiosis is genetic recombination. Recombination creates diversity by mixing the genetic information from each parent into new combinations. Recombination events can be either a reciprocal exchange of DNA called a crossover or a nonreciprocal exchange called a gene conversion or noncrossover (Figure 2). It is the crossovers that become part of a physical structure called chiasmata, which ensures that the homologous chromosomes go to opposite poles and thus partition properly. Because of this essential role, organisms have developed mechanisms (interference [1] and crossover homeostasis [2]) to distribute crossovers nonrandomly within and between chromosomes, such that each chromosome gets at least one crossover (the “obligate” chiasmata [3]). The molecular basis and the relationship between these mechanisms are poorly understood. [taken from introduction]

History

Citation

PLoS Biology, 2009, 7 (5), e1000106

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND PSYCHOLOGY/School of Biological Sciences/Department of Genetics

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

PLoS Biology

Publisher

Public Library of Science

issn

1544-9173

eissn

1545-7885

Copyright date

2009

Available date

26/03/2014

Publisher version

http://www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.1000106

Language

en