SWORD Hernia Paper - BJS Open 2019.pdf (459.1 kB)
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Variation in outcomes and use of laparoscopy in elective inguinal hernia repair

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posted on 21.06.2019, 10:33 by T Palser, D Bowrey, S Swift, I Beckingham, R Williams
Background The early outcomes of inguinal hernia repair in routine practice and the extent to which the laparoscopic approach is used are unknown. The aims of this study were to identify national benchmarks for early reoperation and readmission rates, to identify the degree to which the laparoscopic approach is used for elective hernia surgery in England, and to identify whether there is any variation nationally. Methods All adults who underwent publically funded elective inguinal hernia repair in England during the six financial years from 2011–2012 to 2016–2017 were identified in the Surgeon's Workload Outcomes and Research Database (SWORD). Patients were grouped according to whether they had a primary, recurrent or bilateral hernia, and according to sex. Overall rates of readmission, reoperation and laparoscopic approach were calculated, and variation was assessed using funnel plots. Results Some 390 777 patients were included. Overall, 11 448 patients (2·9 per cent) were readmitted to hospital as an emergency within 30 days of surgery and 2872 (0·7 per cent) had a further operation. Laparoscopic repair was performed for 65·5 per cent of bilateral inguinal hernias compared with 17·1 per cent of primary unilateral inguinal hernias, 31·3 per cent of recurrent hernia repairs and 14·0 per cent of primary unilateral hernias in women. The unadjusted readmission, reoperation and laparoscopy rates varied significantly between hospitals. Conclusion The likelihood of a patient being readmitted to hospital, having an emergency reoperation or undergoing laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair varies significantly depending on the hospital to which they are referred. Hospitals and service commissioners should use this data to drive service improvement and reduce this variation.

Funding

SWORD is funded by AUGIS and ALSGBI.

History

Citation

BJS Open, 2019

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF LIFE SCIENCES/School of Medicine/Department of Health Sciences

Source

International Surgical Congress of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Liverpool, UK

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Published in

BJS Open

Publisher

Wiley

issn

2474-9842

Acceptance date

12/02/2019

Copyright date

2019

Available date

21/06/2019

Publisher version

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/bjs5.50158

Temporal coverage: start date

07/05/2019

Temporal coverage: end date

09/05/2019

Language

en

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